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Former Champ Michael Moorer: 'Time to Split the Heavyweights

Former world light heavyweight and heavyweight champion Michael Moorer is advocating for a new weight division in boxing, believing that the sport needs to adapt to the changing landscape of fighters' sizes.



Michael Moorer


Moorer, who will be inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in June, retired from fighting in 2008 with an impressive record of 52-4-1 (40 KOs). He made history as the first southpaw world heavyweight champion and was known for his fierce competitiveness in both the light heavyweight and heavyweight divisions.


In a recent interview, Moorer expressed his belief that the current trend of super heavyweights in boxing necessitates the creation of a new division. He suggested dividing the heavyweight division into two categories: 200-249 lbs as heavyweight and 250 lbs and above as super heavyweight.


With his vast experience working with legendary trainers like Lou Duva, Emanuel Steward, Freddie Roach, Teddy Atlas, and George Benton, Moorer remains open to training the next generation of heavyweight fighters. He expressed interest in working with top fighters like Anthony Joshua, emphasizing the need for fighters to embrace the physical demands of the sport.


Reflecting on his own career, Moorer acknowledged his evolution as a fighter, transitioning from a formidable 175-pounder to a dominant force in the heavyweight division. Despite missing the adrenaline rush of fight nights, he has found fulfillment in his post-boxing career as a private investigator, NRA-certified firearms instructor, and occasional fitness trainer.


While Moorer's boxing career was filled with memorable moments and challenging opponents like Evander Holyfield and George Foreman, he looks back fondly on his five-round battle with Bert Cooper, a fight that showcased his resilience and power.

As he prepares for his induction into the Hall of Fame, Moorer views his career as a testament to his hard work and dedication. Being recognized among the boxing greats is a validation of his efforts and a legacy he is proud to leave behind.

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