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The Great Bob Foster.

Bob Foster was one of the greatest light heavyweight champions in boxing history, who also challenged some of the best heavyweights of his era. He had a long and successful career that spanned from 1961 to 1978, with a record of 56 wins (46 by knockout), 8 losses, and 1 draw. He was known for his power, speed, and reach, as well as his courage and determination.

Foster started boxing as an amateur in the U.S. Air Force, where he won the All-Service Championship three times and the silver medal at the 1959 Pan American Games. He turned professional in 1961 and won his first nine fights, mostly by knockout. He then moved up to the heavyweight division, where he faced tougher competition and suffered some losses. He was knocked out by Doug Jones, Ernie Terrell, Zora Folley, and Thad Spencer, among others.

Foster decided to focus on the light heavyweight division, where he felt more comfortable and confident. He won several fights against notable opponents, such as Henry Hank, Eddie Cotton, and Roger Rouse. In 1968, he challenged Dick Tiger for the world light heavyweight title and knocked him out in four rounds. It was the only knockout loss of Tiger’s career. Foster became the undisputed champion of the division and defended his title fourteen times against thirteen different challengers. He knocked out most of them, including Vicente Rondon, who held the WBA title that was stripped from Foster for not fighting him earlier.

Foster also continued to fight heavyweights occasionally, hoping to become a two-division champion. He faced Joe Frazier for the world heavyweight title in 1970 and Muhammad Ali for the NABF heavyweight title in 1972. However, he was outmatched by both and lost by knockout. He retired as the light heavyweight champion in 1974, but came back a year later and fought seven more times. He won five of them, but was knocked out by Scott LeDoux and James Scott in his last two fights. He retired for good in 1978.

Foster was widely recognized as one of the best boxers of his time and one of the greatest light heavyweights of all time. He was named the Fighter of the Year by the Boxing Writers Association of America in 1968. He was ranked as the third best light heavyweight and the eighth best puncher of all time by The Ring magazine. He was also inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1990.

Foster’s boxing career was remarkable and inspiring. He overcame many challenges and obstacles to achieve his goals and dreams. He fought with skill, courage, and dignity. He left a lasting legacy in the sport and influenced many future generations of boxers.

Received message. Bob Foster was one of the greatest light heavyweight champions in boxing history, who also challenged some of the best heavyweights of his era. He had a long and successful career that spanned from 1961 to 1978, with a record of 56 wins (46 by knockout), 8 losses, and 1 draw. He was known for his power, speed, and reach, as well as his courage and determination. Foster started boxing as an amateur in the U.S. Air Force, where he won the All-Service Championship three times and the silver medal at the 1959 Pan American Games. He turned professional in 1961 and won his first nine fights, mostly by knockout. He then moved up to the heavyweight division, where he faced tougher competition and suffered some losses. He was knocked out by Doug Jones, Ernie Terrell, Zora Folley, and Thad Spencer, among others. Foster decided to focus on the light heavyweight division, where he felt more comfortable and confident. He won several fights against notable opponents, such as Henry Hank, Eddie Cotton, and Roger Rouse. In 1968, he challenged Dick Tiger for the world light heavyweight title and knocked him out in four rounds. It was the only knockout loss of Tiger's career. Foster became the undisputed champion of the division and defended his title fourteen times against thirteen different challengers. He knocked out most of them, including Vicente Rondon, who held the WBA title that was stripped from Foster for not fighting him earlier. Foster also continued to fight heavyweights occasionally, hoping to become a two-division champion. He faced Joe Frazier for the world heavyweight title in 1970 and Muhammad Ali for the NABF heavyweight title in 1972. However, he was outmatched by both and lost by knockout. He retired as the light heavyweight champion in 1974, but came back a year later and fought seven more times. He won five of them, but was knocked out by Scott LeDoux and James Scott in his last two fights. He retired for good in 1978. Foster was widely recognized as one of the best boxers of his time and one of the greatest light heavyweights of all time. He was named the Fighter of the Year by the Boxing Writers Association of America in 1968. He was ranked as the third best light heavyweight and the eighth best puncher of all time by The Ring magazine. He was also inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1990. Foster's boxing career was remarkable and inspiring. He overcame many challenges and obstacles to achieve his goals and dreams. He fought with skill, courage, and dignity. He left a lasting legacy in the sport and influenced many future generations of boxers.



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